How to Engage Learners efficiently with Rich Media

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Rich media have always been used efficiently as entertainment in the form of films and interactive games. Different forms of edutainment have included features of electronic games in the service of achieving educational goals.

Even though rich media are being used enormously to achieve the educational purpose, yet, learners are not motivated to continue an instructional goal. Why?

Here are a few tips that will help you to design your instructional module with rich media, that will engage learners efficiently –

Minimize unnecessary visuals and text

In the year 1997, Harp and Mayer assessed the learning effects of adding both ‘seductive’ text and visuals to multimedia lessons. Seductive details are normally related to the general topic but are unrelated to the primary instructional goal. Though, these details would certainly spice-up the lessons, but it doesn’t do much judgment to the learning. In 1998, they further concluded that seductive details could distract the learners, by confusing the building of a mental model or by activating inappropriate preceding knowledge.

Utilize right design principles for inexperienced learners

The learner’s level of prior knowledge will help you design appropriate learning using rich media.  Low-knowledge people might benefit immensely by well-designed multimedia than high-knowledge learners. High-knowledge learners will be able to compensate for poorly designed learning compared to low-knowledge learners. According to Mayer (2001), integrating text and diagrams is always considered a good instructional design that helps low-knowledge learners but made little or no difference for high-knowledge learners. Mayer also concludes that, while working with low-knowledge learners, be particularly careful to use relevant principles of multimedia design.

Use simulations effectively with rich media

Simulations not only hold the potential to improve learning but also add value to an instructional program. Simulations are fun and motivating to use, for both children as well as adult learners. During the process of simulation learners acquire a broad discipline-specific knowledge that they are able to later transfer into a professional setting. In a study done by, Moreno, Mayer, Spires and Lester (2001) have noticed that, students learned better from a computer-based simulation game designed to teach environmental science than when the same material was presented as a tutorial with onscreen text and illustrations.

Rich media can enhance learning, provided, if they are used in ways that promote an effective cognitive process in learners;

  • Visuals such as illustrations and animation can improve learning, but animation is not necessarily more productive than illustrations.
  • Audio can enhance learning such as, when the narration supports animation, but background music might divert learners.
  • Including attractive but unrelated words and graphics does not motivate deeper learning but detracts from learning.

Rich media do not create learning, but rich media can enable effective instructional methods that promote learning.
So, use them wisely.

Reference – Robert a Reiser and John V Dempsey. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology (Second ed.).

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© Priya Gopalakrishnan and eLearningbuzz.wordpress.com, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and owner is strictly prohibited.
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